The Curious Incident… (from page to stage)

After having read the novel The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time by Mark Haddon, and  having worked with the text in class, you may be interested in knowing somthing about how the book has been adapted for the stage. BBC Learning Zone has a series of clips to watch.


BBC the curious incident


The Curious Incident … (Lesson 1)
The Curious Incident… (Lesson 2)
The Curious Incident… (Lesson 3)
The Curious Incident… (Lesson 4)
The Curious Incident… (Lesson 5)
The Curious Incident… (Lesson 6)

The Merchant of Venice

The Merchant of Venice

Working with the filmed verison (2004) of Shakespeare’s play.


Before watching the film

Read the story synopsis and the plot overview 

Have a look at themes in The Merchant of Venice: from Sparksnotes

Check up historical references to find out about Venice in the 13th-14th Century, and the status of the Jewish Community in England at Shakespeare’s time.

Find some famous quotes  and expressession (5-10) from The Merchant of Venice. Make a list of these. Find out what they mean or how they are used today.

All Great Quotes: http://www.allgreatquotes.com/shakespearequotes_merchant_venice.shtml

William Shakespeare Quotes: http://www.william-shakespeare.info/quotes-quotations-play-merchant-of-venice.htm

Sparknotes: Important Quotes Explained http://www.sparknotes.com/shakespeare/merchant/quotes.html

You should then watch/listen to the film and pay attention to when and how these words/sentences are used in the story.


After watching the film

Discuss themes in The Merchant of Venice:  use themes from LitCharts

1415297898_stock_save-pdfthe-merchant-of-venice-LitChart

Discuss the situation of the Jewish community in the story?

Which famous quotes/expressions did you notice and in which context were they used (when and how these words/sentences were used) in the story. Do you see any difference in how these expressions are used today compared to how they are used in the film (play)?

Civil Rights…(Lesson 1)

Lesson plan Civil Rights in the English Speaking World

Civil Rights in the English Speaking World

The outline and lesson plans are constructed for lessons which are 60- 90 minutes long.  The instuctions can be downloaded as a pdf 1415297898_stock_save-pdfINSTRUCTIONS: Civil rights_Eng6_Lessonplan or read online.

Each lesson will also appear as a post here on this blog which links and embedded resources.

 

 

 


Lesson 1

I. Introduction to the work unit: written instructions are given out, explanations: requirements and time frame etc (see Outline above).
Martin Luther King Jr. - The Civil Rights Movement

II. Martin Luther King Jr. is a logical starting point for the project Civil Rights – in the English Speaking World. The teachers gives an introduction to the Black Civil Rights Movement in the USA.

A. Presentation Martin Luther King Jr.1415297898_stock_save-pdfMartin Luther King jr CC

 

B. On National Geographic’s web page you can find background and vocabulary useful for studying the issue.

C. a timeline is also useful,

D. and  Martin Luther King Jr.’s famous speech

    is easier to follow if you can also read the text as you listen.

E. For those who want to know more –  The King Center is a good place to start.

F. National Geographic also has more material for those who want to focus on other areas of civil rights.

G. Also see, Civil Rights Movement from History



III. Watch TEDTalk, Yoruba Richen: What the gay rights movement learned from the civil rights movement

You can also read the TEDBlog, What the LGBT movement learned from civil rights: Yoruba Richen at TED2014 http://blog.ted.com/what-the-lgbt-movement-learned-from-civil-rights-yoruba-richen-at-ted2014/

IV. After watching the film, together in class discuss Civil right in the USA and compare to the situation in your own country.

V. Introduce other areas of civil rights in the English speaking world.

  • The Stolen Children (Australia) and other indigenous populations
  • Women’s lib
  • War veterans
  • Religious groups
  • … suggestions from the students

VI. Students start looking for information and to decide their topic.

A document with a list of sources should be set up;

The teacher shows students how to use the Harvard generator referencing web sources. Just cut and paste your url (the text in you search window) and you will get a proper reference, which you then cut and paste into your reference list.

This first list are possible sources to work with such as: text, film, audio… (links), books, etc. This   list you should then continue to work with as you research your project.


Homework 1: As preparation for next lesson – choose one area of civil rights and start looking for information. Your choice should be set before next lesson. Turn in your chosen topic to your teacher and your list of sources so far. Name your document Civil Rights_references_class_your name.

Also see 1415297898_stock_save-pdfINSTRUCTIONS: Civil rights_Eng6_Lessonplan


Civil rights

Martin Luther King Jr. and Civil Rights
Civil Rights – a themed project in English 6
Civil Rights…(Lesson 2)

 

The Curious Incident… (Lesson 2)

Lesson plan The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time, by Mark Haddon.

INSTRUCTIONS_ Reading fiction_The Curious Incident_outline_lessonplan

The outline and lesson plans are constructed for six lessons which are 90-120 mintes long. For shorter lessons the planned content needs to be spread out over two or more lessons. The instuctions can be downloaded as a pdf 1415297898_stock_save-pdfINSTRUCTIONS_ Reading fiction_The Curious Incident_outline_lessonplan or read online. Each lesson will also appear as a post here on this blog which links and embedded resources.


Lesson 2

INSTRUCTIONS: The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night Time

The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time ESL listening 1415648046_Gnome-Audio-Volume-Medium-321415502558_stock_book_green


I. Start the lesson with asking students about their impressions so far of the text.

II. Read the articleSavant Syndrome 2013? Myths and Realities by Darold A. Treffert, MD.

III.Go through difficult vocabulary to help with understanding the text. Then discuss/follow up in class.

IV. Watch Temple Grandin: The world needs all kinds of minds

V. Continue with a group activity. As preparation each student has read 1/3 of the book.

Group activity (in class) – In groups of 3-5 students discuss and compare two head characters from the book.

Note! Give specific examples, quotations from the book. Record your discussion. Either take notes or make a sound record?

Hand in: Either take notes or make a recording of your discussion and hand in before the end of the lesson.

VI. Preparation for the first writing task (Homework 2). Discuss shortly the main characters: Who are they? What is your impression of them?


Homework for next lesson:
After reading the 1/3 of the book and discussing it in class, write a text (300-400 words) where you introduce the main characters of the book.

Note! Assume that the receiver of your text knows nothing about the book at all.

Teacher feedback will focus on form and content.

General Writing Outline

See Instructions (above) or for just the General writing outline

You can download the pdf 1415297898_stock_save-pdfGeneral Writing Outline or read it online.

 

 

 

 


The Curious Incident… (Lesson 1)

The Curious Incident… (Lesson 3)

The Curious Incident… (Lesson 4)

The Curious Incident… (Lesson 5)

The Curious Incident… (Lesson 6)

Kipling: The White Man’s Burden

The White Man’s Burden

Read the poem at the Kipling Society: The White Man’s Burden. It was published in 1899 in the February, 1899 issue of McClure’s Magazine.

Vocabulary for the poem: Quizlet has explanations for words in the poem and pronunciation.

Definition

In February 1899, British novelist and poet Rudyard Kipling wrote a poem entitled “The White Man’s Burden: The United States and The Philippine Islands.” In this poem, Kipling urged the U.S. to take up the “burden” of empire, as had Britain and other European nations…The racialized notion of the “White Man’s burden” became a euphemism for imperialism, and many anti-imperialists couched their opposition in reaction to the phrase (From History Matters. The US survey course on the web).

How do you react to this poem? What does ‘the white man’s burden’ mean today?

Compare the story of Rikki.Tikki-Tavi with the poem The White Man’s Burden and think about how they make you feel? What images do these texts carry?

Kipling’s Rikki-Tikki-Tavi

 

800px-MongooseCobraThe tale about the brave little Mongoose, Rikki-Tikki-Tavi, is a delightful story but it will also give you a picture of what life was like for English colonials and their families in India. Rikki- Tikki-Tavi starts on page 175 in The Jungle Book.

Mongoose and Cobra. From Wikimedia Commons. Image in Public domain.


Mongoose Vs. Cobra from the Smithsonian Channel

”Mongooses and snakes are each other’s deadliest opponents. When they face off, the outcome is utterly unpredictable.”

Diving into the Wreck (Adrienne Rich)

Diving into the Wreck by Adrienne Rich is a poem about identity, about finding oneself.


To read the poem (and comments) see  On “Diving into the Wreck” and How to Read a Poem from poets.org

What do you notice first? What about the title? What wreck? Think about it, but it may not  be necessary to determine exactly what the wreck might be.
Why does the narrator bring  the book, the camera, and the knife for the dive? What do these details say to you?

By the end of the poem, the identity of the narrator moves between one and many, between male and female. Why ? The poem doesn’t have a definite “answer,” but there are many points to discuss. What do you read from it?

 


Also listen to Adrienne Rich on what makes poetry possible


To talk about poetry it is good to know some words such as ‘stanza’. “The word stanza means ‘room’ in Italian…and each stanza is like a room in a house, a lyric dwelling place,” (Edward Hirsch, A Poet’s Glossary). Definitions of stanza and more poetry vocabulary can be found at poetryarchive.org/glossary.


This post is a collection of digital material which can be used for learning and teaching.

The Language of Life (Bill Moyers)

Painting with words. Poetry is not a dead artform. It was not only written by people now long dead. Poetry is alive and it has power. The American poet Bill Moyers calls it ”the living text”.

The Language of Life with Bill Moyers: Welcome to the Mainland


To talk about poetry it is good to know some words such as ‘stanza’. “The word stanza means ‘room’ in Italian…and each stanza is like a room in a house, a lyric dwelling place,” (Edward Hirsch, A Poet’s Glossary). Definitions of stanza and more poetry vocabulary can be found at poetryarchive.org/glossary.


This post is a collection of digital material which can be used for learning and teaching.

”The Walrus and the Carpenter” & Lewis Carroll

Poetry is an artform. It is different from ‘regular’ text, more condensed and ”frequently rely for their effect on imagery, word association, and the musical qualities of the language used.” (poetry.org)

Lewis Carroll wrote Alice in Wonderland. You can listen to Chapter 1 below.


The Walrus and the Carpenter” is a poem from the novel Through the Looking Glass, and What Alice Found There.

 (The original extract from Alice in Wonderland (1951))


 

(Lewis Carroll ~ The Walrus and The Carpenter ~ poem with text)


This presentation [below] ”of the beautifully ridiculous, ridiculously beautiful ”The Walrus and the Carpenter” breaks the poem into each of its stanzas and sometimes into individual lines. Each stanza or line is accompanied by an image from National Geographic.”

NG Geostory_The Walrus and the Carpenter
https://www.geostories.org/geoplayer/the-walrus-and-the-carpenter-br-and-national-geographic/gesE788383BC37DF7039/slate/arial/940/ges7ABCC8A028CDB16BF/geoplay


Poetry FoundationMore poems by Lewis Carroll to be found at Poetry Foundation which is a good site for poetry; ”The Poetry Foundation, publisher of Poetry magazine, is an independent literary organization committed to a vigorous presence for poetry in our culture. It exists to discover and celebrate the best poetry and to place it before the largest possible audience.


NG The Wonderland of Lewis CarollNational Geographic also has an article ”The Wonderland of Lewis Caroll” available to read and view digitally. It is free but requires you to register. I recommend it!


This post is a collection of digital material which can be used for learning and teaching.