Teach using AI-writer

AI-writer is a tool which can be used by students to sidestep the learning process the teacher has intended. To avoid ‘ghost writing’ or plagiarism, or at least design a teaching and learning situation that makes it much harder for students to plagiarise, I suggest teachers can use AI-writer (and similar tools) after the motto ‘if you can’t beat them – join them’.

Generally speaking, shaping methods for tracking, observing and documenting students’ work and learning processes will help in making it harder for students to plagiarise and take ‘short-cuts’. The main focus is to make learning happen, but also to avoid cheating.

The example below outlines such as process and incorporates the use of AI-writer in the teaching and learning process.


Writing exercise using AI writer

Step 1: Go to  ai-writer.com then type in 3-4 keywords and generate a text.

Step 2: Evaluate the sources found. This should be discussed in groups. Remove what is problematic and motivate why.

Step 3: Rework the AI- generated text using sources from  course literature.

Step 4: Write a reflection or discussion on the process.

(The instruction has been edited)

AI writing instruction


You can download the instruction here

Writing exercise using AI writer


Other posts on this topic

The AI that recognises writing style

AI writer, plagiarism and teaching


This post was edited and updated 2019-03-18

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The AI that recognises writing style

I recently wrote a post about AI writer, plagiarism and teaching. but there is also an AI for combatting the problem of students using ghost writers. Ghost writing is when somebody else writes the text and not the student him/herself. Such texts are original and not plagiarised, and will not show up in standard automatic plagiarism checks.

Moo
Image in Public Domain

However, this is a problem which is related to plagiarism, and AI-writer(s) could be considered a kind of ghost writers as well as a form of plagiarism. Whichever way you choose to view the phenomenon the problem stays the same. The student is not representing his/her own knowledge, and is sidestepping the learning process you experience when working with constructing a text.

But if one AI can produce text with a bit of prompting another can learn to recognise the written ‘fingerprint’ of a particular writer and recognise breaks in individual style. Such an AI called EMMA already exists (emmaidentity.com) that from only 5000 words claims to recognise individual writing styles. If you are interested, there is a tutorial  at emmaidentity.com. You will also find terms of use where you find the tutorial. (Due to the new EU Copyright directive I am removing direkt links in posts, to anything which may fall under the new copyright laws. I regret that I  can no longer give you this service).

At this point I have several questions I would like answered before I would begin to trust the results EMMA or other similar AI produce. Foremost, what happens with progression and developing writers’ changes in style and competence? But, just as with AI-writer(s), this is something the teaching community should be aware of and keep an eye out for. For good or for worse, AIs are coming in practically every field and education will be no exception.


Other posts on this topic

AI writer, plagiarism and teaching

Teach using AI-writer



This post was edited and updated 2019-03-18

AI writer, plagiarism and teaching

When you hear the term Artificial Intelligence (AI) you might think of humanoid robots or speech recognition on your phone such as Siri of Google Assistant, but AI services are becoming readily available in all sorts of applications.

AI writer is a text generating AI freely available for anyone on the internet. The chances are students are already using this. If students have not yet discovered this at least it should be safe to say that in alla probability students will be ahead of the teaching community.

Ai writer works like this; you type in a few keywords, for example, “battle of Hastings, British history, Norman conquest”, and your email adress and then simply click the box “write article”. An AI written text with references is then sent to your email and you can retrieve it from your inbox.

In this example (the Battle of Hastings) I received a message and a link to a text to my email.

The AI generated text starts like this;

On October 14, 1066, in England, the Battle of Hastings, King Harold II ( 1022-66 ) of England was defeated by the Norman forces of William the Conqueror ( c. 1028-87 ) .King Harold II of England is defeated by the Norman forces of William the Conqueror at has’s Battle, fought on senlake Hill, seven miles from has, England .3

As part of a rebellion against the new Norman invaders, the Wake of the abbey was plundered in Peterborough .22
After the victory of the head, the count of mercy was killed in the uprising against William his castle and the lands of Dudley were given to William’s Norman supporters .22 It is possible that William the Conqueror planned to attack King Malcolm to prevent Edgar from protecting the aether heli and stop him from advancing in the north of England .22
Edgar the Aetheling joined forces with King Malcolm in Scotland and King Philippe I of France in an attempt to take the throne of English .22

For the full text please follow the link above.

This AI generated text, with some adjustments, would cause trouble for the anti-plagiarism tools used in many Learning Management Platforms (LMS), but would probably not slip past the experienced teacher. In my experience teachers tend to know their students and how they write, and would react to a change of style and level of proficiency. At this point the AI writer is still quite rudimentary, but AIs are developing at breakneck speed and we should keep an eye on what they can (and cannot) do.


I will be posting ideas on how you can use an AI writer as a teaching and learning tools instead of battling it as sneaky sources of plagiarism (which it can be).


Other posts on this topic

The AI that recognises writing style

Teach using AI-writer


This post was edited and updated 2019-03-18

“The Story of an Hour” by Kate Chopin

This post has been edited to conform to the new EU Copyright Directive

Today, Kate Chopin (1850–1904), is recognised as one of America’s essential authors. She has been credited with introducing the modern feminist literary movement. The Encyclopaeida Britannica (2019) writes  that she foreshadowed feminist themes which emerged later in literature. You can read more about her as well as her short stories as KateChopin.org.

Kate Chopin wrote  “The Story of an Hour”  in 1894, and although more than a century has passed the situation in the story is not unheard of in today’s world. You can find the story online at americanliterature.com.

For listening to the story I recommend the recording “The Story of an Hour” read by Heather Ordover, which is a  Librivox recording and in the Public Domain.

Read (and/or listen) then consider what really happened in the story and more importantly why?

The short story is also featured in the textbook Core 2 (Gustafsson et al., 2009, pp. 146-153), including discussion and writing tasks, which can be found online at smakprov.se


References:

Chopin, K. (1894). The Story of an Hour.

Gustafsson, J., Hjorth, M. & Kinrade, E. (2009). Core English 2.  Stockholm: Bonnier utbildning.

Toth, Emily. (2017). “Kate Chopin ‘The Story of an Hour.’” KateChopin.org.

The Editors of Encyclopædia Britannica (February 14, 2016) “Kate Chopin” in Encyclopædia Britannica: Encyclopædia Britannica, inc.


This post was edited and updated 2019-03-18

Practice basic grammar

This post has been edited to conform to the new EU Copyright Directive.

IXL lets you practice a few times without a log in. There are exercises for all levels and for several subjects. Here below you find links to some exercises where you can practice basic, but important, English language skills. Try them out and if you find them useful IXL has more.

Unfortunately due to the new EU Copyright directive I am removing direkt links in posts, to anything which may fall under the new copyright laws. I regret that I  can no longer give you this service.

I list some exercises below which lets you practice BASIC skills. (As I need to remove direct links you have to find IXL’s page and then you can search for the exercises I list below)

PRACTICE: Complete the sentence (agreement)

PRACTICE: Which tense does the sentence use?

PRACTICE: Find the picture that matches the action verb

 

PRACTICE: Homonyms – Match the sentences to the pictures.

PRACTICE: Match antonyms to pictures

 

PRACTICE: Match the contractions to the words.

PRACTICE: Use regular plurals with -s, -es, and -ies


This post was edited and updated 2019-03-18

Ergonomics

This post has been edited to conform to the new EU Copyright Directive.

A project for English and Physical Education.Ergonomics_titlepage

The worksheet includes material on ergonomics as well as language exercises, such as vocabulary and reading comprehension. You can download the Ergonomics_worksheet 1415297898_stock_save-pdf here.

The exercises and questions in the worksheet are based on the information at ccohs.ca (search for ergonomics).

You can read more about ergonomics at  ergonomics.org.uk

For a definition of ergonomics go to the online dictionary – Merriam Webster – and type in ergonomics.


This post was edited and updated 2019-03-18

News and media

This post has been edited to conform to the new EU Copyright Directive.

When learning or teaching English news are a gold mine. News items give you up to date English. They are short, can be chosen after your fields of interest or purpose. The quickest way I know of to improve your proficiency, without actually going to an English speaking country, is to daily read and listen to news in English.

Using news articles from the British Council will supply some help should you need it.


Some news sites:

BBC
CNN
CNN 10 (for students)
Newsweek (international edition)
The Local (Europe’s news in English)
The Local Sweden

 

Due to the new EU Copyright Directive I am removing direkt links in posts to anything which may fall under the new copyright laws. I regret that I  can no longer give you this service.


This post was edited and updated 2019-03-18

Spara

Dystopia in Literature – Lesson 4

After reading Fahrenheit 451 and watching 1984 you should write, “Dystopia in Literature, a Comparative Study”.Dystopia in literature

Write a formal structured ESSAY where you consider the filmed adaptation of 1984 (Orwell) and the novel Fahrenheit 451 (Bradbury), and compare them from the following aspects,

  1. How truth is handled.
  2. How literature is regarded and dealt with.
  3. How war is described and the functions of war.
  4. Hope, if there is hope and in what form and finally,
  5. in the end, who wins and why?

Part 3: Essay Instruction

If you are aiming for the higher grades you can also include a comparison of the use of symbols and metaphors in Fahrenheit 451 and 1984. (See post Literary Devices). In your analysis you should exemplify, building your analysis using examples from the text (quote or retell) and the film (refer to scene or passage).

Your text should have a clear logic with a coherent use of paragraphs, linking devices and a formal register. Remember not to use contractions.

 

General Writing OutlineFor help with your writing, structure, linking words etc. please refer to

Core 2, p. 249 devices for argumentative vs reasoning text)Viewpoints 3, pp 200-201 ”Literary Analysis”
Ready for CAE p. 197 ”Essay”

 

AND the document General Writing Instructions

 

 


References

Gustafsson, J., Hjorth, M. & Kinrade, E. (2009). Core English. 2. (1. uppl.) Stockholm: Bonnier utbildning.

Gustafsson, L. & Wivast, U. (2014). Viewpoints. 3. (1. uppl.) Malmö: Gleerup.

Norris, R. & French, A. (2008). Ready for CAE. Coursebook. Oxford: Macmillan Education.


Dystopia in Literature – Lesson 3

Embedded booklet with full instructions for the theme to the right and below instruction to use while watching the film 1984.Dystopia in literature


Watch 1984 using the instructions for ‘while watching’.  (It should be the version with John Hunt and filmed in 1984)

Questions to consider while you watch. (Take notes)

What is most significant about Winton’s, Julia’s and O’Brains characters?

How do you react to the starting scene and the phrase ”Who controls the past controls the future”?
What is this communal mass outpouring of emotion at the start of the film?

What is the role of Newspeak?
What is the role of censoring?
What is thought crime?
Waht is sex crime?Part 2: while watching 1984
What is the function of the hidden diary in the story? Does it symbolize anything?

What is the significance of (the sign of) the ’crossed arms’?
What is room 101?
What or who is Big Brother? Is he/it a real person?

What is the role of war? In this film?
How is technology used by the party?
Winston lives in Oceania, what is the rest of the world like?

What is the function of the symbols Winston’s paperweight, the St. Clement’s Church picture and the red armed woman and the “the place where there is no darkness.”

Winston’s public confession. Does he believe what he is saying? Is he a broken man?

And what about the relationship between Jula and Winston, how would you describe its different stages?

An most important, what is the role of language? (double think, newspeak)

 



Posts on this theme

Dystopia in Literature – Lesson 1
Dystopia in Literature – Lesson 2
Dystopia in Literature – Lesson 4

Dystopia in literature
Ray Bradbury and Fahrenheit 451
Aldous Huxley and ”A Brave New World”
A Brave New World
George Orwell
George Orwell’s 1984

Dystopia in Literature – Lesson 2

Embedded booklet with full instructions for the theme to the right.Dystopia in literature


Huxley’s A Brave New World is a third well known dystopian novel, together with Fahrenheit 451 and 1984, which in many way is topical in today’s society.

See posts,

Aldous Huxley and ”A Brave New World”

A Brave New World

Read  Chapter 1 from Huxley’s A Brave New World

Discuss:
Analyse and interpret the text. Tie you discussion to the text using examples and quotes.

(The questions below are quoted from the textbook Viewpoints 3 p. 174)

  1. In the text it is suggested that it is better for individuals to focus on particulars rather than generalities. What is meant by this, and how do you think this could be seen to benefit society?
  2. What do you think is meant by the term ‘social stability’ in the text?
  3. The novel Brave New World depicts a society which has been influenced by Henry Ford and his mass production model for car manufacturing. There are countless references to this throughout the novel, such as the use of the expression ‘My Ford’ instead of ‘My Lord’. find other examples of the influence of Ford and his model in this extract.
  4. What is being manufactured in the factory? How is the idea of ‘mass production’ being put into action with this product?
  5. Even though Brave New World was written as a reaction to society in 1932, many argue that the novel is still relevant today. Do you agree? Why/ why not?
  6. One important aspect of society in Brave New World is happiness. As long as citizens are happy, society can be kept stable. It is therefore argued that happiness is more important than truth. What is your opinion on this?
  7. The novel also tackles the age-old question of ‘nature versus nurture’. Research this question an describe how it fits with the text.
  8. What is your stance on nature versus nurture? Explain your view.

Reference: Gustafsson, L. & Wivast, U. (2014). Viewpoints. 3.  Malmö: Gleerup.

Record your discussion or take notes and hand in.

Part 1: while reading Farenheit 451

Then continue reading Fahrenheit 451  using the reading instructions.

 


Posts on this theme

Dystopia in Literature – Lesson 1
Dystopia in Literature – Lesson 3
Dystopia in Literature – Lesson 4

Dystopia in literature
Ray Bradbury and Fahrenheit 451
Aldous Huxley and ”A Brave New World”
A Brave New World
George Orwell
George Orwell’s 1984