Dystopia in Literature – Lesson 4

After reading Fahrenheit 451 and watching 1984 you should write, ”Dystopia in Literature, a Comparative Study”.Dystopia in literature

Write a formal structured ESSAY where you consider the filmed adaptation of 1984 (Orwell) and the novel Fahrenheit 451 (Bradbury), and compare them from the following aspects,

  1. How truth is handled.
  2. How literature is regarded and dealt with.
  3. How war is described and the functions of war.
  4. Hope, if there is hope and in what form and finally,
  5. in the end, who wins and why?

Part 3: Essay Instruction

If you are aiming for the higher grades you can also include a comparison of the use of symbols and metaphors in Fahrenheit 451 and 1984. (See post Literary Devices). In your analysis you should exemplify, building your analysis using examples from the text (quote or retell) and the film (refer to scene or passage).

Your text should have a clear logic with a coherent use of paragraphs, linking devices and a formal register. Remember not to use contractions.

 

General Writing OutlineFor help with your writing, structure, linking words etc. please refer to

Core 2, p. 249 devices for argumentative vs reasoning text)Viewpoints 3, pp 200-201 ”Literary Analysis”
Ready for CAE p. 197 ”Essay”

 

AND the document General Writing Instructions

 

 


References

Gustafsson, J., Hjorth, M. & Kinrade, E. (2009). Core English. 2. (1. uppl.) Stockholm: Bonnier utbildning.

Gustafsson, L. & Wivast, U. (2014). Viewpoints. 3. (1. uppl.) Malmö: Gleerup.

Norris, R. & French, A. (2008). Ready for CAE. Coursebook. Oxford: Macmillan Education.


Annonser

Dystopia in Literature – Lesson 3

Embedded booklet with full instructions for the theme to the right and below instruction to use while watching the film 1984.Dystopia in literature


Watch 1984 using the instructions for ‘while watching’.  (It should be the version with John Hunt and filmed in 1984)

Questions to consider while you watch. (Take notes)

What is most significant about Winton’s, Julia’s and O’Brains characters?

How do you react to the starting scene and the phrase ”Who controls the past controls the future”?
What is this communal mass outpouring of emotion at the start of the film?

What is the role of Newspeak?
What is the role of censoring?
What is thought crime?
Waht is sex crime?Part 2: while watching 1984
What is the function of the hidden diary in the story? Does it symbolize anything?

What is the significance of (the sign of) the ’crossed arms’?
What is room 101?
What or who is Big Brother? Is he/it a real person?

What is the role of war? In this film?
How is technology used by the party?
Winston lives in Oceania, what is the rest of the world like?

What is the function of the symbols Winston’s paperweight, the St. Clement’s Church picture and the red armed woman and the “the place where there is no darkness.”

Winston’s public confession. Does he believe what he is saying? Is he a broken man?

And what about the relationship between Jula and Winston, how would you describe its different stages?

An most important, what is the role of language? (double think, newspeak)

 



Posts on this theme

Dystopia in Literature – Lesson 1
Dystopia in Literature – Lesson 2
Dystopia in Literature – Lesson 4

Dystopia in literature
Ray Bradbury and Fahrenheit 451
Aldous Huxley and ”A Brave New World”
A Brave New World
George Orwell
George Orwell’s 1984

Dystopia in Literature – Lesson 2

Embedded booklet with full instructions for the theme to the right.Dystopia in literature


Huxley’s A Brave New World is a third well known dystopian novel, together with Fahrenheit 451 and 1984, which in many way is topical in today’s society.

See posts,

Aldous Huxley and ”A Brave New World”

A Brave New World

Read  Chapter 1 from Huxley’s A Brave New World

Discuss:
Analyse and interpret the text. Tie you discussion to the text using examples and quotes.

(The questions below are quoted from the textbook Viewpoints 3 p. 174)

  1. In the text it is suggested that it is better for individuals to focus on particulars rather than generalities. What is meant by this, and how do you think this could be seen to benefit society?
  2. What do you think is meant by the term ‘social stability’ in the text?
  3. The novel Brave New World depicts a society which has been influenced by Henry Ford and his mass production model for car manufacturing. There are countless references to this throughout the novel, such as the use of the expression ‘My Ford’ instead of ‘My Lord’. find other examples of the influence of Ford and his model in this extract.
  4. What is being manufactured in the factory? How is the idea of ‘mass production’ being put into action with this product?
  5. Even though Brave New World was written as a reaction to society in 1932, many argue that the novel is still relevant today. Do you agree? Why/ why not?
  6. One important aspect of society in Brave New World is happiness. As long as citizens are happy, society can be kept stable. It is therefore argued that happiness is more important than truth. What is your opinion on this?
  7. The novel also tackles the age-old question of ‘nature versus nurture’. Research this question an describe how it fits with the text.
  8. What is your stance on nature versus nurture? Explain your view.

Reference: Gustafsson, L. & Wivast, U. (2014). Viewpoints. 3.  Malmö: Gleerup.

Record your discussion or take notes and hand in.

Part 1: while reading Farenheit 451

Then continue reading Fahrenheit 451  using the reading instructions.

 


Posts on this theme

Dystopia in Literature – Lesson 1
Dystopia in Literature – Lesson 3
Dystopia in Literature – Lesson 4

Dystopia in literature
Ray Bradbury and Fahrenheit 451
Aldous Huxley and ”A Brave New World”
A Brave New World
George Orwell
George Orwell’s 1984

Dystopia in Literature – Lesson 1

Dystopia in literature”It’s not so much staying alive, as staying human, that is important” (Winston, in the film 1984)

Dystopia in Literature is a themed work, for English 7,  based on Fahrenheit 451 (Ray Bradbury)  & 1984 (George Orwell).

(See embedded booklet with full instructions for the theme to the right)


We start with the concept of dystopia ”an imaginary place where people lead dehumanized and often fearful lives” (Merriam Webster), and introduce the book Farenheit 451.

See the posts,

Dystopia in literature

Ray Bradbury and Fahrenheit 451


Part 1: while reading Farenheit 451When reading the book Farenheit 451 be  careful to follow the reading instructions.

(See embedded instruction to the right, or the full booklet)


For both the of the titles Farenehit 451 and 1984 think about

1) How truth is handled,

2) How literature is regarded and dealt with,

3) How war is described and the functions of war,

4) Hope, if there is hope and in what form and finally

5) In the end, who wins and why?

Taking notes while you read and watch is highly recommended.


Posts on this theme

Dystopia in Literature – Lesson 2
Dystopia in Literature – Lesson 3
Dystopia in Literature – Lesson 4

Dystopia in literature
Ray Bradbury and Fahrenheit 451
Aldous Huxley and ”A Brave New World”
A Brave New World
George Orwell
George Orwell’s 1984

Literary devices

When working with literature and text it is useful to learn and know terms for literary devices. ”Literary devices and terms are the techniques and elements—from figures of speech to narrative devices to poetic meters—that writers use to create narrative literature, poetry, speeches, or any other form of writing” (from LitChart). You will be using these terms (and skills) in work with analysing texts.

LitChart has a list with definitions and a and with lots of examples. Another option is the site Literary Devices or  the page What are Literary Devices?, from Literary Devices  Definition and Examples of Literary Terms.


Useful sites for definitions and explanations:

Dystopia in Literature

Dystopia in literature

Farenheit 451 (Bradbury), 1984 (Orwell) and A Brave New World (Huxley) are three novels which are again, or still, topical. Ethical issues that contemporary society is struggling with, reproduction, genetic modification and cloning, the media, control and surveillance are all depicted in these three novels.

(Instruction for working with Dystopian literature to the right here.)

The review ”Which Dystopian Novel Got It Right: Orwell’s ‘1984’ or Huxley’s ‘Brave New World’?”  refers to the US Presidential elections when

there were almost daily echoes of Orwell in the news, and “1984” began shooting up the Amazon best-seller list. The most obvious connection to Orwell was the new president’s repeated insistence that even his most pointless and transparent lies were in fact true, and then his adviser Kellyanne Conway’s explanation that these statements were not really falsehoods but, rather, “alternative facts.” As any reader of “1984” knows, this is exactly Big Brother’s standard of truth: The facts are whatever the leader says they are (New York Times, FEB. 13, 2017).

These book are examples of dystopian literature, but what is a dystopia, or utopia? Dystopia is defined as

a world in which everything is imperfect and everything goes terribly wrong. Dystopian literature shows us a nightmarish image about what might happen in the near future. Usually the main themes of dystopian works are rebellion, oppression, revolutions, wars, overpopulation and disasters. On the other hand, utopia is a perfect world exactly opposite to dystopia (Literary Devices)

The idea of society gone wrong seem to have its dark allure on us. It is a recurring theme in books and films. The classics titles Farenheit 451, 1984 (Orwell) and A Brave New World are all listed in ShortLists’s ”The 20 best dystopian novels”, but there are other titles, just as well known, and very topical today, such as Margret Atwood’s The Handmaid’s Tale , listed with Huxley’s A Brave New World in the Encyclopedia Britannica as ”10 Devastating Dystopias”.


More posts on this theme

Ray Bradbury and Fahrenheit 451

Aldous Huxley and ”A Brave New World”

A Brave New World

George Orwell

George Orwell’s 1984

Oscar Wilde

Oscar Wilde portraitOscar Wilde was a British writer born in Ireland. He  was a novelist, playwright, poet, and critic. His works have passed into the Public Domain and you can read his texts online at Oscar Wilde online. 

His plays include titels such as The Importance of Being Earnest, and his only novel The Picture of Dorian Gray is famous and topical to this day. Wilde is regarded as one of the most proficient writers in the English language.

Oscar Wilde was famous for his wit and creativity but he was also accused of plagiarims. Read more in the article from the Public Domain Review on On Oscar Wilde and Plagiarism


 

 

A Picture of Dorian Gray


Read and/or listen to the full text A Picture of Dorian Gray at ESL-Bits

Oscar Wilde’s only novel takes a witty, philosophical, and harrowing look at our obsession with youth and the price we pay for it.

Dorian Gray is having his picture painted by Basil Hallward, who is charmed by his looks. But when Sir Henry Wotton visits and seduces Dorian into the worship of youthful beauty with an intoxicating speech, Dorian makes a wish he will live to regret: that all the marks of age will now be reflected in the portrait rather than on Dorian’s own face. His wish comes true. In exchange for this Dorian gives up his soul.

The stage is now set for a masterful tale about appearance, reality, art, life, truth, fiction and the burden of conscience (quote from ESL-Bits).

 


 
The Picture of Dorian Gray - Cover of the first edition From the Preface

”Those who find ugly meanings in beautiful things are corrupt without being charming. This is a fault.”

”Those who find beautiful meanings in beautiful things are the cultivated. For these there is hope. They are the elect to whom beautiful things mean only Beauty.”

”Thought and language are to the artist instruments of an art.”

”Vice and virtue are to the artist materials for an art”

”Those who go beneath the surface do so at their peril”

”It is the spectator, and not life, that art really mirrors ”

Oscar Wilde


A Brave New World

Brave New World was first published in 1932. Huxley’s dystopian book has been adapted for radio and film but also ”influenced many writers, notably Ray Bradbury (Fahrenheit 451), Margaret Atwood (The Handmaid’s Tale) and Kurt Vonnegut (Piano Player).” (See The 100 best novels: No 56 – Brave New World by Aldous Huxley (1932))

The full text is found online;  Brave New World





Related posts

Aldous Huxley and ”A Brave New World”

George Orwell

George Orwell’s 1984

Ray Bradbury and Fahrenheit 451

 

Aldous Huxley and ”A Brave New World”

Aldous Huxley psychical researcher Aldous Huxley (1894- 1963) was born in England but later moved to the United States. He was considered a prominent intellectual of his time,

His concern ”about the power of mass media, the potential manipulation of humans with mood-altering drugs, and the misapplication of sophisticated technology” (see Aldous Huxley) is apparent in his most famous novel A Brave New World.

The title is a quote from Shakesepare;  In Act V Scene I of Shakespeare’s The Tempest, the character Miranda declares,

‘O wonder! How many Godly creatures are there here! How beauteous mankind is! O Brave new world! That has such people in it!’.

Huxley wrote Brave New World ”between the wars” — after the upheaval of the First World War and before World War II (see Cliff Notes for Aldous Huxley´s A Brave New World).

Listen to BBC 4 where Melvyn Bragg and guests David Bradshaw, Daniel Pick and Michele Barrett discuss Aldous Huxley’s dystopian 1932 novel, Brave New World (45 minutes).

 


 Related posts

A Brave New World

George Orwell

George Orwell’s 1984

Ray Bradbury and Fahrenheit 451