Coraline – Lesson 5

BUTTONS


button-eyes

”The black button eyes of the other mother are probably the most iconic or well-known image to come out of Coraline . . .  These buttons essentially act like masks . . . Coraline can’t tell if her other parents are watching her and she can’t get any clues through their eyes as to what they’re thinking” (Shmoop Editorial Team, 2008)

Symbolism

”Symbolism is the use of symbols to signify ideas and qualities by giving them symbolic meanings that are different from their literal sense”

Literary Devices: symbolism definition http://literarydevices.net/symbolism/

The button eyes of the ‘other people’ in Coraline are examples of symbolism in the text.


Lesson plan

Coraline – Lesson 4

 

Part 2

1. Read the following chapters: VI,  VII and VIII .

2. Do the vocabulary exrcises in the worksheet, page 3 (see below)

3.  Reading Comprehension

What is special about the cat in the story?
What does the other mother like to eat, and how do you react to that?
Who are the other children in the closet, and how did they end up there?
What do you think is the significance of the button eyes in this story?

4. Continue working with mapping characters after having reading 2/3 of the book

How do the characters develop as the text progresses? Discuss and compare with students in your group. Pick out specific parts (quote) from the text to support your arguments. Then continue to fill in the characteristics in the map (p.5).


Lesson plan

Coraline Lesson Plan

This lesson plan is available online, where you can also download it in pdf-format.

 

 

 

 


Coraline – Lesson 1
Coraline – Lesson 2
Coraline – Lesson 3
Coraline – Lesson 5
Coraline – After Reading the book

 

Coraline – Lesson 3

Characters

I. Start with the main characters. Who are they? What is your impression of them?

Characters in Coraline.png

II. Characters: How characters are depicted in text.

”Never trust anyone who doesn’t believe in the power of the imagination” (William Shakespeare)

Have a look at the links below. What types of Characters are there in Coraline?

Types of characters in literature

How important are the different characters to the story?

Character Matters

When you read you get a feeling about the people in the story. What does the author do to crate that feeling? Look for clues in the text.

Character Descriptions – Learn from the Pros! ”Show, don’t tell.”


Lesson plan

Coraline Lesson Plan

This lesson plan is available online, where you can also download it in pdf-format.

After reading the book you can do a quiz on the text

You may want to read the Neil Gaiman Exclusive Interview.

You can read more about the author Neil Gaiman on his website http://www.neilgaiman.com/

 

 


Coraline – Lesson 1

Coraline – Lesson 2

Coraline – Lesson 4

Coraline – After Reading the book

Coraline – Lesson 2

Part 1

1. Start by reading the first five chapters:

2. Do the vocabulary exrcises in the worksheet, page 2 (see below)

3.  Reading Comprehension

How would you describe Coraline’s parents?
What is your reaction to the button eyes of Coraline’s other mother?
What has happened to Coraline’s real parents?

4. Start working with mapping characters after reading 1/3 of the book

Discuss and compare characters from the book with students in your group.

Then fill in  characteristics using the form, map of characters at the back of the worksheet (p.5), for the two characters you have chosen. (You will continue to fill in this map/form as you continue to read.)


Coraline Lesson Plan

Lesson plan

This lesson plan is available online, where you can also download it in pdf-format.

After reading the book you can do a quiz on the text

You may want to read the Neil Gaiman Exclusive Interview.

You can read more about the author Neil Gaiman on his website http://www.neilgaiman.com/


Coraline – Lesson 1

Coraline – Lesson 3

Coraline – Lesson 4

Coraline – After Reading the book

Coraline – Lesson 1

”In Coraline’s family’s new flat are twenty-one windows and fourteen doors. Thirteen of the doors open and close. The fourteenth is locked, and on the other side is only a brick wall, until the day Coraline unlocks the door to find a passage to another flat in another house just like her own” (Quote from mousecircus.com)

”Things seem marvelous. But there’s another mother there, and another father, and they want her to stay and be their little girl. They want to change her and never let her go. Coraline will have to fight with all her wits and courage if she is to save herself and return to her ordinary life.” (Quote from neilgaiman.com)

Read an excerpt (Chapters 1 and 2)



There is an interacitve website for Coraline  coraline.com,  where you can find a map and explore Coraline’s world. Have fun but watch out!

coraline-map


Lesson plan

Coraline Lesson Plan

This lesson plan is available online, where you can also download it in pdf-format.

After reading the book you can do a quiz on the text

You may want to read the Neil Gaiman Exclusive Interview.

You can read more about the author Neil Gaiman on his website http://www.neilgaiman.com/

 

 

 


Coraline – Lesson 2

Coraline – Lesson 3

Coraline – Lesson 4

Coraline – After Reading the book

The BFG (Part 4)

The BFG, working with the text

By now you should have a good idea what kind of people the BFG and Sophie are. Continue to read and work with the text.

The BFG lessonplan

1. We read the following chapters: ( 40 minutes)

Dream-Catching, page 73,
A Throgglehumper for the Fleshlumpeater,  page 79,
Dreams, page 89,
The Great Plan, page 107.

Some questions to consider:

  • We all have bad dreams, what seems to be a particularly bad dream for a giant?
  • The BFG learns strange things from the dreams, what?
  • How did the BFG manage to learn to read and write?
  • Why does Sophie take charge by creating this plan to capture the bad giants, and not the BFG? Support your opinion with quotes.
  • Exactly how does Sophie reason when creating this plan?
  • Why does Sophie know so much about Buckingham Palace?
  • Besides stopping the giants, why is Sophie anxious to get out of Giant Country?

The complete worksheet can be found in pdf format below or just click the embedded file above to the right.

Worksheet: 1415297898_stock_save-pdfThe BFG_Work Sheet_illustrated_20160817


For more posts on Roald Dahl and The BFG

Roald Dahl- The BFG

The BFG (Part 1)

The BFG (Part 2)

The BFG (Part 3)

The BFG (Part 5)

The BFG (After reading the book)

The assignment has been constructed in collaboration with Marie Erenius Bergqvist (content)

 

The BFG (Part 2)

The BFG, working with the text

After reading and working with the first third of the book it is time to continue with the next few chapters.

The BFG lessonplan

We read the following chapters: (30 minutes)

The Giants, page 23,
The Marvellous Ears, page 30.

Some questions to consider:

  • Why did this nice giant snatch Sophie away?
  • What does Sophie tell us about the orphanage where she lives?
  • Consider the excellent hearing ability of The BFG. If you hear as well as he does, what happens to you as a person?

The complete worksheet can be found in pdf format below or just click the embedded file above to the right.

Worksheet: 1415297898_stock_save-pdfThe BFG_Work Sheet_illustrated_20160817


For more posts on Roald Dahl and The BFG

Roald Dahl- The BFG

The BFG (Part 1)

The BFG (Part 2)

The BFG (Part 3)

The BFG (Part 4)

The BFG (Part 5)

The BFG (After reading the book)

The assignment has been constructed in collaboration with Marie Erenius Bergqvist (content)

The BFG (Part 1)

The BFG, working with the text

The BFG is the story of a girl called Sophie who meets the Big Friendly Giant. Although he looks scary he is a kind-hearted soul who is an outcast among the other giants  because he refuses to eat children.

We start by reading the first third of the book and work with words and expressions as well as text comprehension.

The BFG lessonplan

We read the following chapters: (25 minutes)

The Witching Hour, page 1,
Who? page 4
The Snatch, page 8,
The Cave, page 12,
The BFG, page 17.

Some questions to consider:

  • When Sophie looks out through the window at night how is the street described?
  • Read the description of the BFG on page 8 and 9. If you didn’t know that a giant was described, what would your impression be then?
  • Now we know that the giant is friendly. What signs would have told that before? In your answer state on what page those signs may be found.
  • The man-eating giants, how do they choose what kind of people to eat?

The complete worksheet can be found in pdf format below or just click the embedded file above to the right.

Worksheet: 1415297898_stock_save-pdfThe BFG_Work Sheet_illustrated_20160817


For more on Roald Dahl and The BFG

Roald Dahl- The BFG

The BFG (Part 2)

The BFG (Part 3)

The BFG (Part 4)

The BFG (Part 5)

The BFG (After reading the book)

The assignment has been constructed in collaboration with Marie Erenius Bergqvist (content)

Roald Dahl – The BFG

Uitreiking Gouden Griffel en Penseel in Utrecht. Roald Dahl (l) en Nannie Kuiper *13 oktober 1982
Foto: av Hans van Dijk / Anefo – Derived from Nationaal Archief, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=36726305

Roald Dahl was born in Wales in 1916 to Norwegian parents. In WWII he was a fighter pilot for the RAF and it was writing about his experiences during this time that started his career as an author. He died in  1990.

You can find out more about Roald Dahl and his books at his homepage roalddahl.com

His books are well know and loved all over the world. Many of his  stories av been made into films, such as Charlie and the Chocolate factory, The Gremlins, the Witches and many more. You can read about these at the blog ROALD DAHL BOOK.

 

 


 


BFG book coverThe BFG (the Big Friendly Giant) by Roald Dahl is illustrated by Quentin Blake. The book is dedicated to Dahl’s  daughter, Olivia, who died of measles  at the age of seven (Wikipedia). Look inside the book (amazon)

Background and characters in the BFG: Here you can read about how the story was born and the characters The BFG, Sophie, the other giants and the queen of England are descibed.

 

Five amazing facts about The BFG

Read the BFG  online (Free Novels Online)


The BFG has been filmed



The BFG (Part 1)

The BFG (Part 2)

The BFG (Part 3)

The BFG (Part 4)

The BFG (Part 5)

The BFG (After reading the book)

 

George Orwell

George-orwell-BBCOrwell was a British journalist and author, who wrote two of the most famous novels of the 20th century ‘Animal Farm’ and ‘Nineteen Eighty-Four’, is how he is presented by BBC History.

At BBC History you can also read that Animal Farm was published in 1945. It is a ”political fable set in a farmyard but based on Stalin’s betrayal of the Russian Revolution”.


Animal Farm strip cartoon


1984-Big-Brother

Nineteen Eighty-Four was published  in 1949. This story is set in an imaginary totalitarian future. (Although 1984 is now in our past). The ”book made a deep impression, with its title and many phrases – such as ‘Big Brother is watching you’, ‘newspeak’ and ‘doublethink’ – entering popular use.”

To learn more about the author George Orwell go to george-orwell.org. Here you can read his work online including  1984 and Animal Farm. If you prefer to listen, the texts are also available as audio books; Animal Farm audio book and 1984 audio book. These hugely popular texts have also been filmed.



 Related post

George Orwell’s 1984