Ergonomics

Ergonomics worksheetsA project for English and Physical Education.

The booklet includes information and facts relating to ergonomics as well as language exercises, vocabulary, reading comprehension etc. (Embedded booklet/worksheet to the right).

”Ergonomics is a science-based discipline that brings together knowledge from other subjects such as anatomy and physiology, psychology, engineering and statistics to ensure that designs complement the strengths and abilities of people and minimise the effects of their limitations. Rather than expecting people to adapt to a design that forces them to work in an uncomfortable, stressful or dangerous way, ergonomists and human factors specialists seek to understand how a product, workplace or system can be designed to suit the people who need to use it.” Read more about ergonomics at ergonomics.org.


Definition from Merriam Webster

 

Annonser

A President’s Address

Posts with the same theme

Theme ‘Visions’

An introduction to langugage ideology and power

A President’s Address

Presidential Speeches: Discussion – rhetorics and power

The assignment ”A President’s Address”

1) A President’s Address

Start with watching and listening to President Obama’s inauguration speech (21 minutes)

After listening read the speech as FUll text

Look up unfamiliar vocabulary to make sure you understand the message in this speech.

The full text with key vocabulary translated into Swedish can be found on pages 9-14 in the textbook Viewpoints 3 (accessable through smakprov.se).  There are vocabulary exercises on (pp. 16-18) in Viewpoints 3.

2) Analyse and interpret (work together in groups of 2-4 students)

  • Would the speech have been different if given by a politican in your country? How ? Try to find at least three points where this speech could have been different.
  • ”The words have been spoken during rising tides of prosperity and the still waters of peace. Yet, every so often the oath is taken amidst gathering clouds and raging storms” The three marked expressions in this quote are examples of metaphors. Why are metaphors used, do you think. What associations (connotations) do these metaphors carry?
  • For more questions see page 15 in the textbook Viewpoints 3

3)  Write a speech to Parliament.

  • You should write your speech and then record your spoken delivery of the speech.
  • The speech should be adapted to the intended audience (which is the Parliament in your country)
  • Your task is to write write a speech on the challenges in the job market for the young generations.
  • The speech should have a thesis, two or three  arguments and one counter argument.
  • You should also include at least one rhetorical device (see the links below)
  • The assignment is adapted from the textbook Viewpoints 3 see page 19 (writing task 1).

Useful links


Related posts for the theme ‘Visions’ Presidential Speeches

  1. An introuduction to language, ideology and power
  2. Complete instructions for the theme ‘Visions’
  3. A President’s address

See the instructions for the complete work for this theme Content _English 7_Presidential Speeches or embedded .


Theme ‘Visions’

Worksheets,

1) Complete lesson plan and complete instructions

Content _English 7_Presidential Speeches1415297898_stock_save-pdf

2) Essential vocabulary

Discourse- power and ideologies_Essential vocabulary

3) Worksheet for discussion (extract from the complete instructions)

English 7_Presidential Speeches_Discussion_20171415297898_stock_save-pdf


VISIONS part 1 Discussion rhetorics and power

Lecture:
Discourse- power and ideologies in language use (Henrika Florén)

(See post An introuduction to language, ideology and power)

Speeches:

  • Inaugural Address by President Barack Obama
  • Inaugural Address by President Donal Trump

(See post A President’s Address)

Texts:
Viewpoints 3 (accessable through smakprov.se)
NBC

Assignments:
1) List of concepts from ”Discourse- power and ideologies in language use”

2) Argumentative text & speech – Speech to the Swedish Parliament

3) Discussion focused on rhetorical devices and the use of ideology and power in two presidential speeches


1. ASSIGNMENTS

Concepts from Discourse – power and ideologies in language use

First watch/listen to the lecture ”Discourse – power and ideologies in language use”.

Then in writing shortly define your understanding of the concepts
concept
powerDiscourse - power and ideologies. Essential vocabulary
ideology
discourse
…and any vocabulary you encounter which is relevant for your understanding of the message

You should write 50-100 words for each concept. Define and explain how you think, not just a definition but explain how YOU understand the use of a concept such as power, or ideology. (For any vocabulary you chose, a definition is enough). This will be the beginning of your own list of vocabulary, concepts and ideas. This should be a living document that you will work on continuously during the course.

Look up the words the document Discourse- power and ideologies_Essential vocabulary

(See post An introuduction to language, ideology and power)


2. Speech to the Swedish Parliament

(See post A President’s Address)

Viewpoints 3 textbook:

Imagine that you have been asked to give a speech to the Swedish Parliament about the challenges young people face in contemporary society. Argue for one key measure that you think the government should take in order to improve young people’s prospects on the job market. Make sure to include a thesis, two or there arguments and at least one counter-argument. You should also use one or two rhetorical devices.

There is a model text on pages 196-197 in Viewpoints 3 , and see page 206 for a list of rhetorical devices.

List of Sources:
Use at least one but not more than three outside sources and include a source list in your manuscript.

You should give your sources in APA format. You can use the citation machine to help you with the format. You can also look at the list of sources at the back of the document with instructions embedded above. They are all listed in APA format.

Please submit both your written manuscript (PDF format) AND your recorded speech (mp4 format)


3. Discussion – rhetorics and power

(See post Presidential Speeches: Discussion – rhetorics and powerPresidential Speeches: Discussion – rhetorics and power

2-3 students in each discussion group
Scope: 5-7 minutes
Preparation: Watch/read the inaugural speeches delivered by Barack Obama and by Donal Trump.

Barack Obama ”A President’s Address” (pp. 9-14 in Viewpoints 3)

Obama delivers first inaugural address. President Barack Obama takes the oath of office and delivers his inaugural address from the steps of the Capitol

Full Text: President Donald Trump’s Inaugural Address

President Donald Trump’s Inaugural Address (Full Speech) | NBC News https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ThtRvBUBpQ4

For each speech find/identify…

  • Metaphorical language – give examples and explain what these metaphors usually mean.
  • Theses & antitheses – give examples and explain
  • Quotes – Do the speakers use quotations? Give examples and find out who they are quoting.

THEN Discuss:

  • Metaphorical language – Use the metaphors you have identified to discuss. Why do you think these metaphors are used?
  • Theses & antitheses – Use the theses/antitheses you have identified to discuss. What impact does use of these theses/antitheses have on the speakers message?
  • Quotes – Use the quotes you have identified to discuss. Give examples of quotes you have identified and dicuss the presidents’ choice of quote. Why do you think a specific quote is used. How does it affect the speakers massage?
  • Compare how the Obama and Trump use different rhetorical devises and how this affects their respective messages?
  • What evidence of ideologies can you find in their speeches? Give examples and motivate.
  • Where and how can you see power in effect in the language use of Obama and Trump respectively? Support your discussion with examples.

More posts on this theme

An introduction to langugage ideology and power

A President’s Address

Presidential Speeches: Discussion – rhetorics and power

An introduction to language, ideology and power…

Watch listen to the lecture on Language, ideology and power…


Worksheet (key vocabulary)

See to that you know what all the words on the list mean. If you already know a concept, leave it blank. If you don’t find out.

The worksheet is available to download here Discourse- power and ideologies_Essential vocabulary 

or you can read online (embedded file below)

Discourse - power and ideologies. Essential vocabulary


Posts with the same theme

Theme ‘Visions’

A President’s Address

Presidential Speeches: Discussion – rhetorics and power

Coraline – Lesson 5

BUTTONS


button-eyes

”The black button eyes of the other mother are probably the most iconic or well-known image to come out of Coraline . . .  These buttons essentially act like masks . . . Coraline can’t tell if her other parents are watching her and she can’t get any clues through their eyes as to what they’re thinking” (Shmoop Editorial Team, 2008)

Symbolism

”Symbolism is the use of symbols to signify ideas and qualities by giving them symbolic meanings that are different from their literal sense”

Literary Devices: symbolism definition http://literarydevices.net/symbolism/

The button eyes of the ‘other people’ in Coraline are examples of symbolism in the text.


Lesson plan

Coraline – Lesson 4

 

Part 2

1. Read the following chapters: VI,  VII and VIII .

2. Do the vocabulary exrcises in the worksheet, page 3 (see below)

3.  Reading Comprehension

What is special about the cat in the story?
What does the other mother like to eat, and how do you react to that?
Who are the other children in the closet, and how did they end up there?
What do you think is the significance of the button eyes in this story?

4. Continue working with mapping characters after having reading 2/3 of the book

How do the characters develop as the text progresses? Discuss and compare with students in your group. Pick out specific parts (quote) from the text to support your arguments. Then continue to fill in the characteristics in the map (p.5).


Lesson plan

Coraline Lesson Plan

This lesson plan is available online, where you can also download it in pdf-format.

 

 

 

 


Coraline – Lesson 1
Coraline – Lesson 2
Coraline – Lesson 3
Coraline – Lesson 5
Coraline – After Reading the book

 

Coraline – Lesson 3

Characters

I. Start with the main characters. Who are they? What is your impression of them?

Characters in Coraline.png

II. Characters: How characters are depicted in text.

”Never trust anyone who doesn’t believe in the power of the imagination” (William Shakespeare)

Have a look at the links below. What types of Characters are there in Coraline?

Types of characters in literature

How important are the different characters to the story?

Character Matters

When you read you get a feeling about the people in the story. What does the author do to crate that feeling? Look for clues in the text.

Character Descriptions – Learn from the Pros! ”Show, don’t tell.”


Lesson plan

Coraline Lesson Plan

This lesson plan is available online, where you can also download it in pdf-format.

After reading the book you can do a quiz on the text

You may want to read the Neil Gaiman Exclusive Interview.

You can read more about the author Neil Gaiman on his website http://www.neilgaiman.com/

 

 


Coraline – Lesson 1

Coraline – Lesson 2

Coraline – Lesson 4

Coraline – After Reading the book

Coraline – Lesson 2

Part 1

1. Start by reading the first five chapters:

2. Do the vocabulary exrcises in the worksheet, page 2 (see below)

3.  Reading Comprehension

How would you describe Coraline’s parents?
What is your reaction to the button eyes of Coraline’s other mother?
What has happened to Coraline’s real parents?

4. Start working with mapping characters after reading 1/3 of the book

Discuss and compare characters from the book with students in your group.

Then fill in  characteristics using the form, map of characters at the back of the worksheet (p.5), for the two characters you have chosen. (You will continue to fill in this map/form as you continue to read.)


Coraline Lesson Plan

Lesson plan

This lesson plan is available online, where you can also download it in pdf-format.

After reading the book you can do a quiz on the text

You may want to read the Neil Gaiman Exclusive Interview.

You can read more about the author Neil Gaiman on his website http://www.neilgaiman.com/


Coraline – Lesson 1

Coraline – Lesson 3

Coraline – Lesson 4

Coraline – After Reading the book

Coraline – Lesson 1

”In Coraline’s family’s new flat are twenty-one windows and fourteen doors. Thirteen of the doors open and close. The fourteenth is locked, and on the other side is only a brick wall, until the day Coraline unlocks the door to find a passage to another flat in another house just like her own” (Quote from mousecircus.com)

”Things seem marvelous. But there’s another mother there, and another father, and they want her to stay and be their little girl. They want to change her and never let her go. Coraline will have to fight with all her wits and courage if she is to save herself and return to her ordinary life.” (Quote from neilgaiman.com)

Read an excerpt (Chapters 1 and 2)



There is an interacitve website for Coraline  coraline.com,  where you can find a map and explore Coraline’s world. Have fun but watch out!

coraline-map


Lesson plan

Coraline Lesson Plan

This lesson plan is available online, where you can also download it in pdf-format.

After reading the book you can do a quiz on the text

You may want to read the Neil Gaiman Exclusive Interview.

You can read more about the author Neil Gaiman on his website http://www.neilgaiman.com/

 

 

 


Coraline – Lesson 2

Coraline – Lesson 3

Coraline – Lesson 4

Coraline – After Reading the book

The BFG (Part 4)

The BFG, working with the text

By now you should have a good idea what kind of people the BFG and Sophie are. Continue to read and work with the text.

The BFG lessonplan

1. We read the following chapters: ( 40 minutes)

Dream-Catching, page 73,
A Throgglehumper for the Fleshlumpeater,  page 79,
Dreams, page 89,
The Great Plan, page 107.

Some questions to consider:

  • We all have bad dreams, what seems to be a particularly bad dream for a giant?
  • The BFG learns strange things from the dreams, what?
  • How did the BFG manage to learn to read and write?
  • Why does Sophie take charge by creating this plan to capture the bad giants, and not the BFG? Support your opinion with quotes.
  • Exactly how does Sophie reason when creating this plan?
  • Why does Sophie know so much about Buckingham Palace?
  • Besides stopping the giants, why is Sophie anxious to get out of Giant Country?

The complete worksheet can be found in pdf format below or just click the embedded file above to the right.

Worksheet: 1415297898_stock_save-pdfThe BFG_Work Sheet_illustrated_20160817


For more posts on Roald Dahl and The BFG

Roald Dahl- The BFG

The BFG (Part 1)

The BFG (Part 2)

The BFG (Part 3)

The BFG (Part 5)

The BFG (After reading the book)

The assignment has been constructed in collaboration with Marie Erenius Bergqvist (content)