A Brave New World

Brave New World was first published in 1932. Huxley’s dystopian book has been adapted for radio and film but also ”influenced many writers, notably Ray Bradbury (Fahrenheit 451), Margaret Atwood (The Handmaid’s Tale) and Kurt Vonnegut (Piano Player).” (See The 100 best novels: No 56 – Brave New World by Aldous Huxley (1932))

The full text is found online;  Brave New World





Related posts

Aldous Huxley and ”A Brave New World”

George Orwell

George Orwell’s 1984

Ray Bradbury and Fahrenheit 451

 

Annonser

Aldous Huxley and ”A Brave New World”

Aldous Huxley psychical researcher Aldous Huxley (1894- 1963) was born in England but later moved to the United States. He was considered a prominent intellectual of his time,

His concern ”about the power of mass media, the potential manipulation of humans with mood-altering drugs, and the misapplication of sophisticated technology” (see Aldous Huxley) is apparent in his most famous novel A Brave New World.

The title is a quote from Shakesepare;  In Act V Scene I of Shakespeare’s The Tempest, the character Miranda declares,

‘O wonder! How many Godly creatures are there here! How beauteous mankind is! O Brave new world! That has such people in it!’.

Huxley wrote Brave New World ”between the wars” — after the upheaval of the First World War and before World War II (see Cliff Notes for Aldous Huxley´s A Brave New World).

Listen to BBC 4 where Melvyn Bragg and guests David Bradshaw, Daniel Pick and Michele Barrett discuss Aldous Huxley’s dystopian 1932 novel, Brave New World (45 minutes).

 


 Related posts

A Brave New World

George Orwell

George Orwell’s 1984

Ray Bradbury and Fahrenheit 451

The Canterville Ghost

Image in public domain. Book from Project Gutenberg: The Canterville Ghost. Fetched from Internet Archive

Oscar Wilde‘s short story The Canterville Ghost is one of my personal favourites. The humour of the clash between the modern and the traditional, the old world and the new is still fun and a good read. It is a story with elements of comedy, tradegy and great compassion.

The Canterville Ghost is available to read and listen to through ESL -Bits, which is an online resource where you can read the text and/or listen to the stories at two different speeds.


You can find out more about the author Oscar Wilde  at  Biography.com,  BBC history, and the official website for Oscar Wilde.

 

 

 


The Canterville Ghost – part 1

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Coraline – Lesson 2

Part 1

1. Start by reading the first five chapters:

2. Do the vocabulary exrcises in the worksheet, page 2 (see below)

3.  Reading Comprehension

How would you describe Coraline’s parents?
What is your reaction to the button eyes of Coraline’s other mother?
What has happened to Coraline’s real parents?

4. Start working with mapping characters after reading 1/3 of the book

Discuss and compare characters from the book with students in your group.

Then fill in  characteristics using the form, map of characters at the back of the worksheet (p.5), for the two characters you have chosen. (You will continue to fill in this map/form as you continue to read.)


Coraline Lesson Plan

Lesson plan

This lesson plan is available online, where you can also download it in pdf-format.

After reading the book you can do a quiz on the text

You may want to read the Neil Gaiman Exclusive Interview.

You can read more about the author Neil Gaiman on his website http://www.neilgaiman.com/


Coraline – Lesson 1

Coraline – Lesson 3

Coraline – Lesson 4

Coraline – After Reading the book

Coraline – Lesson 1

”In Coraline’s family’s new flat are twenty-one windows and fourteen doors. Thirteen of the doors open and close. The fourteenth is locked, and on the other side is only a brick wall, until the day Coraline unlocks the door to find a passage to another flat in another house just like her own” (Quote from mousecircus.com)

”Things seem marvelous. But there’s another mother there, and another father, and they want her to stay and be their little girl. They want to change her and never let her go. Coraline will have to fight with all her wits and courage if she is to save herself and return to her ordinary life.” (Quote from neilgaiman.com)

Read an excerpt (Chapters 1 and 2)



There is an interacitve website for Coraline  coraline.com,  where you can find a map and explore Coraline’s world. Have fun but watch out!

coraline-map


Lesson plan

Coraline Lesson Plan

This lesson plan is available online, where you can also download it in pdf-format.

After reading the book you can do a quiz on the text

You may want to read the Neil Gaiman Exclusive Interview.

You can read more about the author Neil Gaiman on his website http://www.neilgaiman.com/

 

 

 


Coraline – Lesson 2

Coraline – Lesson 3

Coraline – Lesson 4

Coraline – After Reading the book

The Curious Incident… (Lesson 5)

Lesson plan The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time, by Mark Haddon.

INSTRUCTIONS_ Reading fiction_The Curious Incident_outline_lessonplan

The outline and lesson plans are constructed for six lessons which are 90-120 minutes long. For shorter lessons the planned content needs to be spread out over two or more lessons. The instuctions can be downloaded as a pdf 1415297898_stock_save-pdfINSTRUCTIONS_ Reading fiction_The Curious Incident_outline_lessonplan or read online. Each lesson will also appear as a post here on this blog which links and embedded resources.


I.Themes:

What are themes? and how do I find them? Theme in Literature

Finding a Theme of a Book

Literary Devices: Theme and examples of themes http://literarydevices.net/theme/

Common themes in literature – tutorial http://www.sophia.org/tutorials/common-themes-in-literature

II. The teacher gives examples of themes in well known stories, for example Lord of The Rings, Snow White etc… And ask students to give examples of stories, films, books… with common themes for example love, good and evil.

 

III.Teacher feedback on the second writing task (Homework 4). IV. Students read in class while individual feedback is given.


Homework 5: Finish reading the book chapters 191-233 for next lesson. Think about themes in the book. Also prepare 3-5 examples from the text to discuss next lesson.


 

A little book with the most common words in English

The 100 most frequent words make up about 1/3 of everything written in English. The 300 most most frequent words are 2/3 of the written language. Learning to spell these words correctly is an effective way to filter out common mistakes both native and second language users often make.


 

Most Common Words in EnglishI have made a small illustrated book with the 100 most common words in English. The book is free to use and available in several formats.

To read on-line, click the embedded file to the left.

Or it you would rather download choose the pdf below.

1415297898_stock_save-pdf100 Most Common Words in English_HF

Creative Commons License This book is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

New page with free books for children

80x15 for children is a new page on the website. It is placed under Books in English

Here you find picture books and story books in the public domain. The page is still under construction and more titles will be added continously.

the hole bookA personal favourite is The HOLE Book by Peter Newell, but there are many other delightful books also in the public domain. Beatrix Potter’s picture books are some of these (see below).

For collections of books for children in the public domain you can search at

Internet Archive: Children’s Library
Project Gutenberg: Children’s Picture books
The Library of Congress: Children’s Literature

 

the tale of squirrel nutkin BP

the tale of peter rabbit

The Tale of Squirrel Nutkin 

&

The Tale of Peter Rabbit

by Beatrix Potter