Ray Bradbury and Fahrenheit 451

ray_douglas_bradbury
Image in public domain from wikimedia commons

Ray Bradbury ”published hundreds of short stories and close to fifty books, as well as numerous poems, essays, operas, plays, teleplays, and screenplays, Bradbury was one of the most celebrated writers of our time. His groundbreaking works include Fahrenheit 451, The Martian Chronicles, The Illustrated Man, Dandelion Wine, and Something Wicked This Way Comes” (from raybradbury.com)

”Set in the twenty-fourth century, Fahrenheit 451 introduces a new world in which control of the masses by the media, overpopulation, and censorship has taken over the general population. The individual is not accepted and the intellectual is considered an outlaw. Television has replaced the common perception of family. The fireman is now seen as a flamethrower, a destroyer of books rather than an insurance against fire. Books are considered evil because they make people question and think. The people live in a world with no reminders of history or appreciation of the past; the population receives the present from television” (from Cliffnotes)


”Is it true that firemen used to put out fires and not burn boooks?”


Themes, motifs and symbols in Fahrenheit 451

Themes:

Themes are the fundamental and often universal ideas explored in a literary work.

Censorship; Knowledge versus Ignorance

Motifs:

Motifs are recurring structures, contrasts, and literary devices that can help to develop and inform the text’s major themes

Paradoxes, Animal and Nature Imagery, Religion

Symbols

Symbols are objects, character, figures and colours used to represent ideas or concepts

Blood, “The Hearth and the Salamander”, “The Sieve and the Sand”, The Phoenix, Mirrors


 

Coraline – Lesson 5

BUTTONS


button-eyes

”The black button eyes of the other mother are probably the most iconic or well-known image to come out of Coraline . . .  These buttons essentially act like masks . . . Coraline can’t tell if her other parents are watching her and she can’t get any clues through their eyes as to what they’re thinking” (Shmoop Editorial Team, 2008)

Symbolism

”Symbolism is the use of symbols to signify ideas and qualities by giving them symbolic meanings that are different from their literal sense”

Literary Devices: symbolism definition http://literarydevices.net/symbolism/

The button eyes of the ‘other people’ in Coraline are examples of symbolism in the text.


Lesson plan

Coraline – Lesson 4

 

Part 2

1. Read the following chapters: VI,  VII and VIII .

2. Do the vocabulary exrcises in the worksheet, page 3 (see below)

3.  Reading Comprehension

What is special about the cat in the story?
What does the other mother like to eat, and how do you react to that?
Who are the other children in the closet, and how did they end up there?
What do you think is the significance of the button eyes in this story?

4. Continue working with mapping characters after having reading 2/3 of the book

How do the characters develop as the text progresses? Discuss and compare with students in your group. Pick out specific parts (quote) from the text to support your arguments. Then continue to fill in the characteristics in the map (p.5).


Lesson plan

Coraline Lesson Plan

This lesson plan is available online, where you can also download it in pdf-format.

 

 

 

 


Coraline – Lesson 1
Coraline – Lesson 2
Coraline – Lesson 3
Coraline – Lesson 5
Coraline – After Reading the book

 

Coraline – Lesson 3

Characters

I. Start with the main characters. Who are they? What is your impression of them?

Characters in Coraline.png

II. Characters: How characters are depicted in text.

”Never trust anyone who doesn’t believe in the power of the imagination” (William Shakespeare)

Have a look at the links below. What types of Characters are there in Coraline?

Types of characters in literature

How important are the different characters to the story?

Character Matters

When you read you get a feeling about the people in the story. What does the author do to crate that feeling? Look for clues in the text.

Character Descriptions – Learn from the Pros! ”Show, don’t tell.”


Lesson plan

Coraline Lesson Plan

This lesson plan is available online, where you can also download it in pdf-format.

After reading the book you can do a quiz on the text

You may want to read the Neil Gaiman Exclusive Interview.

You can read more about the author Neil Gaiman on his website http://www.neilgaiman.com/

 

 


Coraline – Lesson 1

Coraline – Lesson 2

Coraline – Lesson 4

Coraline – After Reading the book

Coraline – Lesson 2

Part 1

1. Start by reading the first five chapters:

2. Do the vocabulary exrcises in the worksheet, page 2 (see below)

3.  Reading Comprehension

How would you describe Coraline’s parents?
What is your reaction to the button eyes of Coraline’s other mother?
What has happened to Coraline’s real parents?

4. Start working with mapping characters after reading 1/3 of the book

Discuss and compare characters from the book with students in your group.

Then fill in  characteristics using the form, map of characters at the back of the worksheet (p.5), for the two characters you have chosen. (You will continue to fill in this map/form as you continue to read.)


Coraline Lesson Plan

Lesson plan

This lesson plan is available online, where you can also download it in pdf-format.

After reading the book you can do a quiz on the text

You may want to read the Neil Gaiman Exclusive Interview.

You can read more about the author Neil Gaiman on his website http://www.neilgaiman.com/


Coraline – Lesson 1

Coraline – Lesson 3

Coraline – Lesson 4

Coraline – After Reading the book

Coraline – Lesson 1

”In Coraline’s family’s new flat are twenty-one windows and fourteen doors. Thirteen of the doors open and close. The fourteenth is locked, and on the other side is only a brick wall, until the day Coraline unlocks the door to find a passage to another flat in another house just like her own” (Quote from mousecircus.com)

”Things seem marvelous. But there’s another mother there, and another father, and they want her to stay and be their little girl. They want to change her and never let her go. Coraline will have to fight with all her wits and courage if she is to save herself and return to her ordinary life.” (Quote from neilgaiman.com)

Read an excerpt (Chapters 1 and 2)



There is an interacitve website for Coraline  coraline.com,  where you can find a map and explore Coraline’s world. Have fun but watch out!

coraline-map


Lesson plan

Coraline Lesson Plan

This lesson plan is available online, where you can also download it in pdf-format.

After reading the book you can do a quiz on the text

You may want to read the Neil Gaiman Exclusive Interview.

You can read more about the author Neil Gaiman on his website http://www.neilgaiman.com/

 

 

 


Coraline – Lesson 2

Coraline – Lesson 3

Coraline – Lesson 4

Coraline – After Reading the book

Language history – Lesson 1

English today is a world language but it all started in the British Isles. To understand the history of English developed it helps if you have access to maps which describe the region and how people (and languages have moved). A series of good maps for illustrations can be found at History of English podcast. Here you can also find a number of podcasts on English language history. There are 85 ! episodes, but among the most relevant are

Way back in time

Celts, Angles and Saxons

Vikings

Normans

 

 

You can listen to the sounds of English through history using the BBC Ages of English Timeline

ages-of-english-timeline


Roald Dahl and Fantastic Mr Fox

the-fatastic-mr-fox-esl-bitsRoald Dahl’s Fantastic mr Fox is available at ESL-Bits short stories

You can learn more about Fantastic Mr Fox, Roald Dahl and the wonderful world of his stories at http://www.roalddahl.com/ where you can meet the characters and look at some Quentin Blake’s marvelous illustrations.

mr-fox-characters

If you are a teachaer there are lesson plans and other resources.

 


More on Roald Dahl and his stories

Roald Dahl – The BFG
The BFG (Part 1)
The BFG (Part 2)
The BFG (Part 3)
The BFG (Part 4)
The BFG (Part 5)
The BFG (After reading the book)